‘headache (hoofbeats)’ in Butcher’s Dog

Butcher's Dog Issue 8

Butcher’s Dog is a biannual poetry magazine, founded in the North-East of England. It has rotating co-editors, and a policy of anonymous submissions.

The 40-page issue 8 is co-edited by Sophie F Baker, Amy Mackelden, and Clare Pollard, with a cover by Isabel Rock. It contains work from 25 poets, and I’m delighted it includes my poem ‘headache (hoofbeats)’. I’ve really enjoyed reading the issue.

Thanks to all the editors!

Update Feb 2017: There’s a good review of the issue by Eleanor Benson at Cuckoo Review. My poem is described as a “hallucinatory and gritty monologue”.

‘The Trade’ in The Stinging Fly

The Stinging Fly Issue 35 Volume 2

The Stinging Fly is a journal from Dublin featuring short stories, essays and poems, by Irish and international writers. The 160-page Winter 2016-2017 issue has a theme of “Fear and Fantasy”, with a cover illustration by Gary Coyle. The guest editor for the issue is Mia Gallagher, and her compelling editorial for the issue was reprinted in The Irish Times (editorial here). Nineteen poets are represented in the issue, and I’m delighted my poem ‘The Trade’ is included.

Many thanks to Mia Gallagher, and the team at The Stinging Fly!

Leigh Hunt on reading poetry while eating (1821)

Every lover of books, scholar or not, who knows what it is to have his quarto open against a loaf at his tea … ought to be in possession of Mr. Coleridge’s poems, if it is only for ‘Christabel’, ‘Kubla Khan’, and the ‘Ancient Mariner’.

–Leigh Hunt, Examiner, 21st October 1821 (source: Wikipedia on ‘Kubla Khan’)

‘Exploding Head Manifesto’ in Cordite Poetry Review

Recent poetry round-up (1): Cordite Poetry Review 56: Explode is out now, and I’m very pleased to say it contains my poem about Exploding Head Syndrome: ‘Exploding Head Manifesto‘.

It’s my second appearance in Cordite, after my earlier ‘Thy will be done‘.

Thanks to issue editor Dan Disney, and Kent MacCarter!

‘But after’ in Eye to the Telescope

I’m really pleased that my poem about reincarnation ‘But after’ appears in the interesting and broadly-themed “Ghosts” issue of Eye to the Telescope.

Thanks to editor Shannon Connor Winward! Edited to add: and thanks too for her fascinating series of seven blog posts, talking about the selection process for the issue and her thoughts on the poems she chose (and their relation to each other, and sequencing). The blog posts are a great read. Here is the seventh and last post which includes discussion of ‘But after’ (there are links to the rest of the series at the end of the post).

Dorothea Lasky on poetry and education

I’ve always deeply blamed our education system, because I do think there’s elitism at play that wants to make not only poetry, but all the arts very specialised past a certain point of development. Certainly in high school only the ‘smart’ children […] are privy to learning how to ‘unpack’ a poem, how to really tackle poem and conquer it, because their intellect is made to seem so specialised. We don’t, especially in the US, want to look at poetry as something every student is capable of, because that would be dangerous to those who control the school systems. All students, regardless of their backgrounds, would realise that they are capable of speaking very well; that there are not certain individuals who control what constitutes good language. They would realise that language is not just this agreed upon set of constructed ideas, that it’s not an MLA citation or a five-paragraph essay, that everyone can create new and beautiful language. So it is very frustrating to me when people say, ‘I don’t like poetry,’ or, ‘I don’t understand it,’ because all of that seems the fault of a system that doesn’t want to give poetry its power, and that doesn’t want to give people their power either.

— Dorothea Lasky, in an interview with Rebecca Tamás at Prac Crit.